Plant Talk | Science Talk

What’s Beautiful Now: A Rosy Outlook

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on June 5th, 2017 by Matt Newman – Be the first to comment

Photo of rosesWeek of June 5, 2017

Of all our collections—some 50 in total—the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden is a stand-out in the spring, sweeping into June with a panorama of classic colors. Whites, reds, pinks, and yellows abound, and of our 650 rose varieties, there’s certainly something for everyone to love.

While our Rose Garden Weekend was a huge success, the roses are expected to continue showing off their best sides through this coming weekend at the least, so don’t miss out on their spring bloom! Meanwhile, the herbaceous peonies across from the Conservatory continue to delight everyone who passes by—you really can’t overlook them.
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On Medical Cannabis & Modern Histories

Posted in From the Library on June 1st, 2017 by Esther Jackson – Be the first to comment

Esther Jackson is the Public Services Librarian at NYBG’s LuEsther T. Mertz Library where she manages Reference and Circulation services and oversees the Plant Information Office. She spends much of her time assisting researchers, providing instruction related to library resources, and collaborating with NYBG staff on various projects related to Garden initiatives and events.


Photo of Smoke SignalsMedical marijuana is a hot topic in many parts of the United States. In New York, the use of medical marijuana has been approved for the treatment of symptoms of various diseases and conditions. Those wishing to learn more about medical marijuana should consider attending NYBG’s Adult Education Medical Cannabis class which will likely be offered in the fall of this year.

While it is not legal to grow marijuana in New York, the books below offer insight into marijuana culture and history, as well as information about how marijuana is cultivated legally by those in states that permit such practices.

Smoke Signals: A Social History of Marijuana—Medical, Recreational and Scientific by Martin A. Lee chronicles the history of marijuana in America. Lee is not the first author to write a history of Cannabis sativa, but the social history focus of this book is especially interesting for readers who want to know the legal aspects of marijuana criminalization, regulation, and legislation in the United States. In addition, the author also explores contemporary medical research around using marijuana to treat conditions including cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, and chronic pain. Lee, a journalist, is skilled at drawing the reader in and also does the more motivated researcher the service of providing an extensive bibliography for further reading.
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Threshold: Biodiversity, Climate, and Humanity at a Crossroads

Posted in From the Library on May 31st, 2017 by Vanessa Sellers – Be the first to comment
Photo of Threshold

(L to R) Speakers John Nagle, Ursula Heise, and Shahid Naeem

On March 9, the Humanities Institute’s Fourth Annual Symposium was held at the Garden, offering a vital discussion among three renowned experts, and the larger public, on biodiversity and nature conservation in the era of climate change. Convened by the Humanities Institute and the Center for Science and Society, as well as History Initiative at Columbia University, this symposium served as a critical introduction to key issues about modern society and its relationship with the environment.

Challenging issues such as the possibility of future life on Earth, participants were invited to ask themselves the following questions: What does biodiversity mean in the broader context of 21st-century environmental politics and ethics and in the specific case of the 2016 Paris Agreement? Is there a common, sustainable future possible in this new period of American isolationism, when Washington threatens to pull out of global environmental treaties, such as the 2016 Paris Agreement? What are the most urgent eco-political and ethical laws that need enforcing to ascertain the availability of the world’s natural resources to tomorrow’s generation? Challenging questions that need expert knowledge and guidance.
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What’s Beautiful Now: Blooming Like Catmints & Dogwoods

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on May 30th, 2017 by Matt Newman – Be the first to comment

Week of May 28, 2017

An odd coincidence of springtime is the sometimes simultaneous display of our Cornus kousa, or dogwood, and the aromatic arrival of Nepeta, or catmint. But they’re not the only beauties making themselves known across grounds this week. Look for the peak bloom of the herbaceous peonies, the continued reign of the tree peonies, the ongoing revival of the Rose Garden, and the Rock Garden’s transition from spring floral spotlights to lush summer escape.

Tree of the Week: Cornus kousa, flowering dogwood

Tree of the Week: <em>Cornus kousa</em>, flowering dogwood
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Look for the expanding white floral bracts of Cornus kousa in bloom throughout the Garden. Wonderful specimens of this small statured tree can be found near the staircase into the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden and along the path within the Burn Family Lilac Collection. Be sure to walk through the Benenson Ornamental Conifer collection to see many unique cultivars of this great species.

Student Stories: From Summer Intensive to Landscape Design Graduates in Just One Year

Posted in Adult Education on May 30th, 2017 by Samantha Fletcher – Be the first to comment

Photo of Intensives students in the Native Plant Garden

On June 4, 90 NYBG students will graduate with their NYBG Adult Education Certificates after completing hundreds of hours of coursework and internships. Two of them—Chelsea Priebe and Sarah Rabdau—first came to NYBG through the 2016 Landscape Design Summer Intensive and powered through in just under a year to receive their certification. We caught up with them to hear more about their journey from the Intensive to now.
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Wildlife in the Garden: Spa Day

Posted in Wildlife on May 24th, 2017 by Patricia Gonzalez – 2 Comments

Patricia Gonzalez is an NYBG Visitor Services Attendant and avid wildlife photographer.


Photo of frog

A bullfrog at Twin Lakes – Photo by Patricia Gonzalez

Spotlights from the Shelf: Classics Old & New

Posted in From the Library on May 23rd, 2017 by Samantha D’Acunto – 1 Comment

Samantha D’Acunto is the Reference Librarian at The New York Botanical Garden‘s LuEsther T. Mertz Library.


Photo of book coverThe circulating children’s collection at the LuEsther T. Mertz Library has titles that support the creative imaginations of our young readers! The fantastical illustrations and lyrical narratives offered in many of our books invite readers to experience a world beyond the surface all while digging deep to learn about the environment around them. The titles featured below are new to our shelves and are perfect examples of fun and educational reads. We hope to see you in the library soon!

You Wouldn’t Want to Live Without Dirt! By Ian Graham / Illustrated by Mark Bergin (2016)

In another installment of the You Wouldn’t Want to series, You Wouldn’t Want to Live Without Dirt provides insight on dirt with the familiar elements the other titles in this series offer. Weather you use dirt or soil, this book encourages all readers to view it from every angle. The interactive You Can Do It boxes sprinkled throughout the book encourage readers to explore the components of soil by conducting hands-on experiments. The book answers essential questions like “What is dirt?” and challenges the reader to consider the future of soil. The narrative offers information and new vocabulary throughout. You will not be able to turn a page without learning something new about dirt. Like its sister titles, You Wouldn’t Want To Live Without Dirt is a wonderful read for children being introduced to the topic or those who are starting an elementary grade science project.
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What’s Beautiful Now: Peony Power

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on May 22nd, 2017 by Matt Newman – Be the first to comment

The peonies are in prime form this week, and are not to be missed as they put on a parade of color beyond the Conservatory doors. The tree peonies, likewise, are showing off and living up to their fanciful cultivar names—bringing the blooms just as the nearby Rose Garden begins to tease its earliest color.

In the Native Plant Garden, you can find a taste of early summer in the rich greens and small, bright flowers, while the Rock Garden continues to grow into its lush seasonal colors.

Perennial of the Week: Paeonia lactiflora various cultivars, herbaceous peony

Perennial of the Week: <em>Paeonia lactiflora</em> various cultivars, herbaceous peony
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Glorious showy blooms are held above rich green foliage on these peonies. Amidst the Matelich Anniversary Peony Collection, you will find a wide range in form from single to fully double, with satiny petals in white, pink, coral and red. They offer up scents of rose, lemon, honey, or musk that sing of Spring and even warmer days to come! You will find this collection along Perennial Garden Way, with more than 150 herbaceous peonies reaching their peak in mid-May.

Wildlife at the Garden: Sun-Soaked

Posted in Wildlife on May 17th, 2017 by Patricia Gonzalez – Be the first to comment

Patricia Gonzalez is an NYBG Visitor Services Attendant and avid wildlife photographer.


Photo of an Italian wall lizard

An Italian wall lizard (Podarcis sicula) in the Native Plant Garden – Photo by Patricia Gonzalez

What’s Beautiful Now: Greenest Acres

Posted in What's Beautiful Now on May 15th, 2017 by Matt Newman – Be the first to comment

Photo of Magnolia x wieseneriThis week the herbaceous peonies are sitting in the spotlight, just as their buds begin to burst into whorls of white, red, and pink along the pathway before the Haupt Conservatory. These brief but beautiful flowers are a must-see in spring!

Elsewhere in the Garden, the azaleas are still showing some color as they begin their decline, and the greenery of our 250 acres is on full display, filling out the Forest with the airy glow of millions of new leaves. You won’t regret a stroll on our miles of trails.

Check out what else is happening at the Garden this week.

Perennial of the Week: Amsonia hubrichtii, threadleaf bluestar

Perennial of the Week: <em>Amsonia hubrichtii</em>, threadleaf bluestar
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Though native to the Ouachita Mountains in central Arkansas, Amsonia hubrichtii is not a common perennial. This erect, clump-forming perennial reaches three feet in height and width. Noted for its powdery-blue spring flowers, feathery green summer foliage, and golden fall color, this plant is popular for its versatility of use in borders, native plant gardens, rock gardens, and open woodland areas. You can find this beauty around the Perennial Garden and the Azalea Garden.