Plant Talk | Science Talk

This Weekend: See Rare Oaxacan Weaving Techniques and More

Posted in Programs and Events on August 28th, 2015 by Vilina Phan – Be the first to comment

IVO_6379Come visit the Garden this weekend to see a very special presentation occurring in Ross Hall this Saturday, a part of FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life. You’ll get to meet Mixtec weavers on their first trip to New York as they demonstrate the ancient art of weaving textiles using dye produced by an endangered purple sea snail. Only a handful of artisans possess the skills to harness the dye! After the presentation, their work will be available for purchase at Shop in the Garden.

We’ll also be featuring live music and dance from acclaimed performers Jarana Beat, a band that mixes Afro-Amerindian Mexican sounds with activist messages. You can also find screenings of films that celebrate the art and culture of Mexico. So grab your friends and family and head over to the Garden this weekend, and see for yourself what everyone is talking about!
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Concrete Jungle Flourishes through Green-Up

Posted in Learning Experiences, People on August 28th, 2015 by Plant Talk – Be the first to comment

Ken Iwuoha worked with Bronx Green-Up this summer, and will be attending York College this fall. Bronx Green-Up, the community garden program of The New York Botanical Garden, provides horticultural assistance, community organizing and training to Bronx gardens and urban farms. For more information, click here.


Ken readies a harvest of serrano peppers harvested from Bronx community gardens. The peppers will be made into Bronx hot sauce (http://bronxhotsauce.com), a product available at the Shop at NYBG and local Greenmarkets.

Ken readies a harvest of serrano peppers harvested from Bronx community gardens. The peppers will be made into Bronx hot sauce, a product available at the Shop at NYBG and local Greenmarkets.

Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Ken Iwuoha. I am a SYEP (Summer Youth Employment Program) worker for the summer of 2015. I have worked for The New York Botanical Garden for over six weeks, with the Bronx Green-Up Program.

As an individual born and raised in the Bronx, I have adapted to buildings, construction, and pollution—the “City Life.” I used to think that planting a tree in front of your house was the best way of being green. After working for Bronx Green-Up, however, my point of view has changed completely. Donating plants and providing services to local community gardens and schools has opened my eyes to the beauty of the Bronx. read more »

Morning Eye Candy: Aren’t You Gladiolus?

Posted in Around the Garden, Photography on August 28th, 2015 by Lansing Moore – Be the first to comment

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Gladiolus murielae in the Ladies’ Border – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

Preserving the Legacy of Lord & Burnham

Posted in History on August 25th, 2015 by Stephen Sinon – 2 Comments

Stephen Sinon is Head of Information Services and Archives in the New York Botanical Garden’s LuEsther T. Mertz Library.


Sample of plans from the Lord & Burnham Co. collection

Sample of plans from the Lord & Burnham Co. collection

The Lord and Burnham Co. was the premier builder of glasshouses in 19th- and 20th-century America. The firm was a natural choice for the founders of The New York Botanical Garden to turn to as they commissioned the design and construction of the largest and finest conservatory in America, the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, which remains the centerpiece of the Garden today. Lord and Burnham constructed glasshouses for many well-known private clients, schools, parks, and botanical gardens across the country, but they never built anything larger than the Haupt Conservatory, which features a 90-foot central dome and one acre under glass.

The original plans and drawings for the Haupt Conservatory can be found in the Garden Archives along with architectural plans for 140,000 other clients which form part of the surviving business records of the Lord and Burnham Co.
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Morning Eye Candy: Kiku in Training

Posted in Photography on August 25th, 2015 by Matt Newman – Be the first to comment

This year’s kiku display is on the move—primarily upwards. These rapidly growing plants are anxious for fall, when they’ll be flowering fully in the Bourke-Sullivan Display House starting October 31.

Kiku

Young kiku (chrysanthemums) in the Nolen Greenhouses for Living Collections – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

Morning Eye Candy: Magenta Monday

Posted in Photography on August 24th, 2015 by Lansing Moore – Be the first to comment

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Hibiscus moscheutos ‘Jazzberry Jam’ in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

 

Morning Eye Candy: A Call for Shade

Posted in Photography on August 21st, 2015 by Matt Newman – Be the first to comment

Shady

In the Benenson Ornamental Conifers – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

This Weekend: Catch Summer’s Final Days at the Garden

Posted in Programs and Events on August 21st, 2015 by Lansing Moore – Be the first to comment

Benenson Ornamental Conifer collectionThe week is over, and the humidity is gone with it. Take advantage of the pleasant outdoors this weekend at NYBG with a full schedule of tours, programs, and activities for all ages—including our ongoing exhibition FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden Life.

We’re already looking towards a gorgeous autumn here at the Garden, with a whole new season of wonderful programs. The annual Edible Academy Family Picnic takes place on September 27, and this year’s exclusive benefit for the future of NYBG’s children’s organic vegetable gardening program will feature more activities and special guests than ever.

Click through for the full schedule for this weekend at the Garden.

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The Lorillard Jar

Posted in History on August 19th, 2015 by Stephen Sinon – 2 Comments

Stephen Sinon is Head of Information Services and Archives in the New York Botanical Garden’s LuEsther T. Mertz Library.


Old Stone Mill Lorillard Snuff Mill

The Stone Mill

It’s not every day that someone walks into your life to present you with a piece of history from your past, but that is exactly what happened here recently at The LuEsther T. Mertz Library. We had a visitor who rode the Garden tram and heard mention of the Lorillard family on the tram’s narrated tour. She recalled owning a jar with the name “Lorillard” written on it and wondered if there was any connection.

As it turned out, the jar in question happened to be filled with tobacco snuff which was milled at the Garden’s historic Stone Mill and apparently never opened. The gift of this jar was accompanied by several commemorative catalogs from the Lorillard Tobacco Company and a newspaper article dated December 31, 1893, discussing the award winners at the World’s Fair held in Chicago that year. Known as the World’s Columbian Exposition, the fair was held to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus on the shores of the Americas.

The numerous Neoclassical stucco facades found at the fair, the first to feature electrical illumination, earned it the name “The White City” and had a profound influence on the urban beautification movement in America. The Mertz Library Building and The New York Botanical Garden itself grew out of this movement. read more »

Birder’s Paradise: The Fall Migration

Posted in Wildlife on August 18th, 2015 by Debbie Becker – 5 Comments

Debbie Becker has been The New York Botanical Garden’s resident bird expert for over 25 years, and continues to lead her popular Bird Walks on Saturday mornings throughout much of the year. She maintains Birding Around NYC, where readers can find photo galleries of recent NYBG bird walks and up-to-date lists of species seen during each outing.


An Osprey makes off with lunch

An Osprey makes off with lunch

As the end of summer draws near, deep sighs can be heard from school children and cries of delight from parents. The pleasures of the warmer months are shared by many in different ways. For those of us who are naturalists and birders, we endure the summer months dreaming about the end of August, because it signals the most exciting seasonal change: the great fall bird migration.

Our plants and trees—it is their time to shine—have spent the summer producing berries and seeds to nourish the migrating birds. The fruit of the crabapple, dogwood, and viburnum become ripe with juicy berries for Scarlet Tanagers, Baltimore Orioles, and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, while the sweet gum tree offers nestled seeds—in sticky balls—to American Goldfinch, Pine Siskins, Red-winged Blackbirds and Purple Finch. Cedar Waxwings will also partake in harvesting berries for sustenance. Eastern Kingbirds use the ripe berries as lures to catch insects attracted to the sweet nectar. Birders and photographers fancy themselves capturing these scenes over and over again and flock to NYBG to enjoy the fall bird migration.
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